Monthly Archives: January 2012

Spicebox Canadian Spiced Whisky

Spicebox Canadian Spiced Whisky is quite the oddity. While not a true whisky, it is not a liqueur either; it straddles a fine line that makes it hard to place. For our sake we decided to label it a spirit for our Top Spirits section. Yet if there is one thing that this “whisky” has going for it, is the sweet aroma that is so inviting even long after your glass is empty. The blended whisky is a combination of malts aged 3-6 years in bourbon barrels and a particular rye as the base. The spice is a combination, supposedly consisting of three types of vanilla beans, pepper, nutmeg, and fruits. While it isn’t the first or only spiced whisky available on the Canadian market, it has been growing in popularity amongst a niche population of drinkers. Best enjoyed neat.

-Tristan

*****

The Spicebox is not at all as I expected; I did not expect it to be quite so delicately sweet and complex. I expected more sharp, piquant spices such as cinnamon. I was also expecting an overabundance of added flavours which drown out the natural whisky flavours — as many spiced spirits tend to do, trying to cover up the terrible underlying taste — however; I was pleasantly surprised to find the Spicebox subtle, well integrated, and still a whisky!

The most profound spice I found to be nutmeg. It appears quite clearly and distinctly both on the nose and palate. Along with this, notes of caramel and vanilla appear on the nose, while some chocolate, toffee, and butterscotch appear on the palate, making it quite a great little winter drink — I’d like to try it with egg-nog. Nevertheless, the Spicebox is enjoyable on it’s own, and does not require anything to mix it with; while it may work well as a mix, it’s more than acceptable as a sipping spirit.

What is quite remarkable about this unique spirit is how it changes. While the nutmeg notes are found most clearly, different spices accompany it on the nose than on the palate than on the finish. With this said, the finish is my favourite part of the Spicebox. It becomes quite herbal, with notes of wintergreen and anise — almost root-beer like.

Nose: 23
Body: 21
Taste: 22
Finish: 23.5

Kamran: 89.5 pts.

*****

First recommended to me by Kamran at his work, and it was so good I ended up buying a bottle. A very reasonably priced product, this whiskey is perfect for savouring and slowly sipping as to maximize the room-filling aroma. This golden auburn coloured spirit is sweet. It smells like cookie dough with the amount of nutmeg, vanilla, toffee and spices included. The best part is, even long after the glass is empty, the smell lingers. On first taste it is quite sweet, light on the tongue and mild in terms of that whisky sensation. The vanilla is certainly more promient than the spice. The aftertaste on the palate reflects more of the spices included yet is brief. Mild taste overall. This is certainly a novelty and not something to have too frequently. People who enjoy sweet things would find this up their alley, but those who prefer to have the peat and oak flavors of a traditional whiskey may not be too keen to try this, no matter how good it smells.

Nose: 25
Body: 22
Taste: 22
Finish: 24

Tristan: 93

*****

I must really like spiced liqour, because I found the Spicebox to be particularly memorable, for all the right reasons.

We are greeted by a noticeable nutmeg aroma combined with hints of vanilla and a complimentary segment of Bourbon. This unique scent really sends your senses flying. The body, upon tasting, reveals itself to be rather smooth and easily drinkable, with a light, pleasant burn on the lips that really helps you to capture and preserve the flavours in this unusual blended whisky. Speaking of flavours, they remind me of the Old Port rum, except of a lower grade of intensity. Where the Old Port was heavy on spice, the Spicebox actually offers a much smoother and more subtle experience, with the intensity of the spice nicely balanced out by the vanilla. I particularly enjoyed the finish of the Spicebox, which gave a long-lasting impression of drinking a root beer, with distinct sweet, caramel overtones.

This is another spiced liqueur that I would like to try with eggnog, though in all honesty I would thoroughly enjoy this on its own. As someone who is new to whisky, this is a great introduction.

Nose: 24
Body: 23
Taste: 24
Finish: 22

James: 93

*****

Final Average: 91.83

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Amrut Old Port Rum

In the past several years, Amrut distillery in India has become world famous. Known for producing some of the finest single malts in the world, including the Amrut Fusion, which uses a blend of (peated) Scottish and (unpeated) Indian barley. Ranked by Jim Murray, in his 2010 Whisky Bible, as the 3rd greatest whisky in the world, the Fusion brought Amrut worldwide recognition, which, as their market has expanded, has been growing ever since.

While their single malts are primarily developed for export, Amrut’s Old Port rum has been well received both beyond and within the borders of India, a nation of which Rum is the most widely consumed spirit. There is a good reason for this: vast quantities of sugarcane and spices may be found in the East Indies; therefore, delicious products may be produced cheaply.

– Kamran

*****

For both its whiskies and rums, Amrut have quickly become one of my favourite distilleries. The Amrut Sherry Intermediate and Amrut Fusion are amongst the finest whiskies I have had the pleasure of tasting, while the Amrut Old Port is one of my favourite rums. At $37 (Private Liquor Store price), it’s an incredible value; the rum is more delicious than many rums at twice the price. What is truly exceptional about this rum is the smell. Made from 100% pure Indian sugarcane, the Old Port boasts what is, quite honestly, one of the finest bouquets emitted by any distilled spirit. The sweet smell of sugarcane, molasses, caramel, vanilla, butterscotch and maple is quite indescribable; I could smell the rum all day

While it is a particularly smooth rum that you could take shots of quite easily, the Old Port is, without question, a sipping rum. It is one that you do not want to mix with anything, as any added flavours would ruin it. What you want to do is sip and savour the taste, while smelling deeply for that retronasal flavour. At its low price, only a few dollars more than your typical cheap rums — Bacardi, Captain Morgan’s, Appleton Estate etc. — the Old Port comes highly recommended; there is no reason for a rum drinker to miss out on this one!

Nose: 25
Body: 22
Taste: 23.5
Finish: 22.5

Kamran: 93 pts.

*****

Amrut’s Old Port Rum is certainly one of the more unique rums I have had the pleasure to taste. Its colour is that of a nice hardwood such as mahogany or stained maple as it sits neat in the glass. The aromatic smell is a wonderful blend of toffee, nutmeg and butterscotch wafting upwards to the nasal cavity… it truly smells excellent. While the rum does have a certain sharpness to it, the zest is eased by the butterscotch and vanilla that cover the palate. Being made from cane sugar it is certainly sweet but the combination of spices and a hint of smokiness are also good for balancing this, making it pleasant to sip on after adjusting to the initial sip. The finish is one that lingers on spice and a faint oak flavour cleansing the mouth and throat. We did not try this rum with and mix, but I am sure that it would go well with coke, ginger ale or eggnog; however, it’s just as good neat. A solid rum, and one that I would recommend to any spiced rum connoisseur.

Nose: 25
Body: 20
Flavour: 24
Taste: 25
Tristan: 94

*****

Immediately, one is greeted by a pleasantly spiced scent, with nutmeg predominating, that acts as a major factor in enticing you to try this very West Indian style rum. And when you do, you are definitely not disappointed. The texture is nothing amazing, reminiscent of many other more common rums, which goes down smooth yet offers a modest, pleasant warming sensation. Diving into the flavours, we find a very spicy mixture, that even in small amounts will create a definite buzz on your palate, and screams out to combined with eggnog at Christmas time. The fascinating thing is, the experience with this rum seems to be divided into two distinct stages. First, the spice creates a warming kick, which soon fades slightly, and allows the second stage to enter, which consists of the rich flavours of the rum itself. This partnership enhances the experience tremendously, making it thoroughly enjoyable. The nice thing is, the experience continues into the finish, allowing the drinker to enjoy the taste for several minutes. Recommended to those who aren’t afraid to try a unique blend of spice and rum which will leave you wanting more.

To put it simply, give me a jug of eggnog and a bottle of this and I’ll be happy.

Nose: 24
Body: 20
Taste: 25
Finish: 23

James: 92

*****

Final Average: 93 pts.

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Kraken Black Spiced Rum

Kraken Black Spiced Rum has a cool bottle!

Named after a mythical and legendary sea beast, the Kraken, a black spiced rum from the Caribbean boasts a high ABV (47%), rich and complex spices — caramel in particular — and a cool bottle to boot. It is blended with natural flavours (additives) and imported worldwide. It seems to be growing in popularity — perhaps for it’s taste, perhaps for the bottle and commercials, or perhaps a combination of both!

– Kamran

*****

The Kraken looks like it belongs on a pirate ship; it is certainly one of the sickest, and most novel bottles I’ve ever seen liquor distributed in, and is worth owning for just that reason. Besides this, the rum tastes quite good, and goes down smoothly, in spite of the high alcohol percentage.

However, while it is quite enjoyable in its own right to sip this rum, it is much more fun to play around with it. I have found that it goes best with Dr. Pepper — yes, better than Coke, Pepsi, Root Beer, etc.. I think it must have something to do with complementing flavours of vanilla and caramel that may be associated with each of these drinks independently. Of course, in the interest of reviewing it fairly, we enjoyed this rum neat — its scores reflect this. Frankly, as a mixed drink, I would rate this quite significantly higher.

While there are subtle notes of caramel, molasses, vanilla, and cinnamon on the nose, the relatively strong aroma of alcohol subdues these spices just a little too much. This continues on the palate, which is likely why it is best when mixed; it seems to need a little something to bring out the flavours. It is quite smooth, yet has a sharp bite; however, after this sharp bite, the sweetness remains on the palate while the strength of alcohol does not!

Nose: 20.5
Body: 19.5
Taste: 21.5
Finish: 23.5

Kamran: 85 pts.

*****

First off I have to compliment Kraken on their recent advertising, it seems to work as this rum has stormed the local market. Not only that, but the old time bottle and period artwork make the bottle alone a cool thing to have. The rum itself is as the name indicates, spiced and black. When one unleashes the Kraken, they unleash something more than a typical rum… a 47% ABV rum with 94 proof. This Caribbean rum is sweet to smell from the molasses and mildly spiced. I found the initial taste to pick up more on the molasses before the spices such as cinnamon and licorice  stuck to the back of my palate. That said, the sweetness and spice did mellow into a nice warm sensation in my mouth. The finish sat on the back of my palate for  a lengthy period, and despite being such a high volume rum, the smoothness of the spirit was surprising. Of note, when mixed with coca cola it tastes like Doctor Pepper. A good, versatile  rum to mix with.

Nose: 22
Body: 22
Taste: 23
Finish: 24

Tristan: 91

*****

Where’s the rum gone? Oh, there it is, the Kraken’s got it. Worth a purchase just for the novelty of having a product called The Kraken, this black spiced rum is a nice way to start off your evening. Greeted by a full caramel scent, that’s perfectly balance so as to not overpower your senses, this rum is very inviting. The tasting reveals a rum with a slight edge that indicates the correct blend of spices, combined with a certain smoothness that allows for easy drink-ability. The flavour does not disappoint either, with a hint of smokiness mixed with just the right amount of spice. The finish, however, is where this rum losses it’s footing. I found that I was left with a very sharp aftertaste, which was somewhat tort, most likely due to the high alcohol content. To miss this severely detracted from the experience, diminishing it’s overall score.

It is worth noting that this rum may be better served as the base for a cocktail, as this would balance out the sharpness of the finish. Stay tuned to future reviews to see just how well it fairs.

Nose: 22
Body: 22
Taste: 20
Finish: 15

James: 79

*****

Final Average: 85 pts.

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Tullibardine 1488, Traditional Ale

Tullibardine Traditional Ale

Tullibardine 1488 Traditional Ale is a cask aged ale from Tullibardine’s brewery, aged in barrels from their renowned distillery. This 500ml bottle contains a medium bodied beer that weighs in at 4.5% ABV, making it less of a force compared to the Whisky Beer produced by Tullibardine. While this beer may lack the whisky wow-factor of other similar styled beers, its complexity of balanced flavors do make up for it; however, the cost makes this beer best as an occasional special treat as opposed to something to consume several of in one night.

-Tristan

********

This Tullibardine ale is named the Traditional for good reason: it is brewed like a traditional 90 shilling Scottish ale. However, the fact that it is oak aged, while adding depth and dimension to the flavours, makes it not so ‘traditional’. While it has a more robust malt backbone than Tullibardine’s 1488 Whisky Ale, the malt flavours are somewhat softened by the oak aging, leaving the malt notes somewhere between a fruity and creamy sweetness — this is not typical of traditional 90 shilling scotch ales, which tend to have a more profound flavour of roasted malt.

Because of this, it’s difficult to pin down this beer; it’s somewhere in between a typical oak aged beer and a traditional ale. In spite of this, the beer doesn’t suffer from overcrowding; in fact, the flavours are quite well integrated, balanced, and complement each other. It’s reasonably light, yet creamy and fulfilling; it has a malted sweetness that is subtly fruity, yet the oak/wood/whisky notes even this out; it has a medium-long length, yet is quite crisp — the finish remains consistent. All in all, the Tradition Ale is an enjoyable beer, inoffensive in any way, and well balanced; you could certainly have more than one, although your pockets would have to be quite deep!

Nose: 20.5
Body: 21
Taste: 19
Finish: 20.5

Kamran: 81 pts.

*******

Compared to the other Tullibardine 1488 sampled, the “Premium Whisky Beer”, this traditional recipe is much more successful in that it is well balanced in key areas. While it is by no means a heavy or strong beer, it boasts a variety of notes that can be determined from smell, taste and finish that are most certainly pleasing to pick up on. Served in a 500ml bottle, this beer is a rich chestnut colour with a light off-tan head. The nose is floral and fruity with a rich helping of malt, and a mild mix of vanilla and whiskey – the latter from the cask aging. The body is, as previously mentioned, lighter than expected yet constant with a pale ale. Not too watery, but certainly well carbonated. The taste was certainly strong in malt, possibly nutty in flavor, while it posessed a certain sweetness of vanilla or toffee to balance it from the malt and whisky. The finish of this beer was equally complex, certainly left a dry, almost bitter malty taste on the palate which softened into one where oak lingered the longest. This beer ranks highly in my opinion because it manages to keep all the ingredients from overpowering another, unlike the whisky beer produced by the same brewer. Unfortunately the only drawback is the high price for this beer, considering it comes in single bottles and is an import. It would seem then that this beer is best saved for an occasion that is special as opposed to a beer to have on a whim.

Nose: 23
Body: 20
Taste: 23
Finish: 22.5

Tristan: 90.5

*******

For someone, like myself, who is not a huge whisky fan, this particular Tullibardine ‘Traditional Ale’ blend is much more akin to my tastes.

From initial observations, however, it appeared this beer would fall flat. Greeted by a scent more reminiscent of a weak pale ale, I was concerned this Tullibardine creation would fall on hard ground, similar to their ‘Whisky Beer’. However, upon tasting, I was glad to find these concerns were not warranted. A rich, smokey flavour perfectly coincides with its dark, murky appearance that turns out to be very easy to drink due to its low amount of carbonation. With this strong flavour in tow, the finish leaves the drinker with a consistent hint of roasted malt, which may not appeal to some, but in the right amount can really add character to a beer that may otherwise lack an identity.

Although the scent does not send your senses jumping, the other qualities of this beer act as redeeming qualities, and its smoothness allows for an enjoyable experience after more than 1 bottle. However, for the price, there are certainly better options out there that can create a similar experience with a more unique flavour. An Innis & Gunn Original would be my preferred choice.

Nose: 17
Body: 20
Taste: 21
Finish: 21

James: 79 pts

*****

Final Average: 83.5 pts.

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Tullibardine 1488, Premium Whisky Beer

Tullibardine are best known as a distillery who produce a highland single malt scotch, but they also produce a collection of beers. One of which is their award winning strong English ale, the “Tullibardine 1488 Premium Whisky Beer”. This bottled beer is strong at 7% and certainly one of the most expensive we’ve seen for its size. The process in which it is made is similar to the Innis & Gunn style of aging the ale in casks. The Tullibardine brewery age the ale in freshly disgorged casks for up to twelve weeks to add not only the richness of the oak barrel, but the inclusion of whisky that had been absorbed by the wood orginally. It has a strong nose, body and flavour, if whisky beer is your niche perhaps this one is up your alley.

– Tristan

****
As a whisky enthusiast and Tullibardine advocator, I can’t help but love the idea of this beer — I became quite excited when first hearing about it. My excitement was some what dampered when I saw the price — even with $1 off, it’s almost twice the price  of the original Innis & Gunn, which is a relatively expensive beer in its own right. Money aside, I had to try this beer, and have done so several times before we conducted our tasting. Perhaps this explains why I like this beer so much more than James and Tristan; the Tullibardine Whisky Ale seems to be a beer of acquired taste. I think my familiarity with whiskies as well as this beer in particular permitted me to enjoy it more than the others.

With that said, despite being an enjoyable whisky beer, assertively flavoured with a delicate touch of Tullibardine sweetness, this whisky ale is not for everyone, and even for those that it does work for, it’s not quite worth the price — I’d much rather have an Innis & Gunn in each pocket. The subtle complexities and obvious whisky notes of this ale are to be enjoyed but once in a while. One is enough, you don’t find yourself wanting another anytime soon, and it’s a nice treat  to sip this unique beer from time to time. As one’s palate becomes accustomed to its flavours,  I believe that it gets better and better with each visit.

Nose: 20
Body: 21.5
Taste: 21
Finish: 19

Kamran: 81.5 pts.

*****

While  whisky beers have become a favorite of mine, as with the brewery Innis & Gunn, I cannot help but find this particular ale of Tullibardine to miss the mark… or rather overshoot it. Instead of delivering a well rounded whisky beer that truly compliments the other ingredients, I’m left wondering what else could be in the ale aside from the oak and whisky. Upon first sniff I was overwhelmed by the strength of the whisky and could not locate the vanilla that the brewer claims is in there. The ale, honey or light amber in colour, was quite opaque and appeared more of a wheat beer than a traditional ale. It was a strong bodied beer to be certain, but the whisky taste seemed to overpower the sweetness of the vanilla or nuts that were added. The finish was what really fell flat for me. There was only the slightest amount of spice to the ale, and the whisky taste was certainly short lived. Personally this beer was too heavy on the whisky side and poorly balanced unlike their traditional 1488 ale. Unlikely I’d buy this beer again, even if the price dropped to a more reasonable amount.

Nose: 19
Body: 18
Taste: 16.5
Finish: 13

Tristan: 66.5

*****

To continue the whisky beer theme, we offer you an immediate comparison to Innis & Gunn with Tullibardine and their version of whisky-inspired beer. Offering a similar scent to the I&G 21yr, yet with a more obvious citrus presence compared with hints of vanilla, it is a perfect invitation to try this beer. Initial impressions are good, with a low carbonation that creates a smooth texture, but also makes the beer quite heavy, lowering its consumption factor.

What causes this beer to fall, in my eyes, is the taste and finish. With the Innis and Gunn, the whisky qualities are subtle, adding to the character of the beer. Tullibardine, on the other hand, has a domineering whisky flavour, overpowering any other flavours which may be present. It is powerful enough to take away from the flavours naturally occurring in the beer and replace them with a glass of whisky. The finish does not help matters by dying extremely quickly, leaving the drinker wondering what happened?

For those who like their whiskys, this may be the beer for you, as it essentially feels like having a very large, cool, whisky. For all others, I recommend trying this once, but no more than that.

Nose: 22
Body: 20
Taste: 15
Finish: 12.5

James: 69.5

*****

Final Average: 72.5 pts.

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Innis & Gunn 21 Year Old Highland Cask (2010 Edition)

Brewed in Scotland, Innis & Gunn follow a unique avenue in beer craftsmanship: oak-aging! You heard correctly; this is beer that, like most whiskies, rums, and red wines, has sat in an oak barrel, slowly picking up the flavours — vanilla, toffee, caramel, oak, etc. — the wood has to offer. There are few breweries that perform this feat, and Innis & Gunn, the originators, are — put simply — the best.

Oak cask maturation not only gives the beer it’s colour, it transforms the flavour compounds in ways unlike anything else. In the case of Innis & Gunn’s annual Highland Cask, the beer is stored for 49 days in a previously used Highland scotch Cask — note that the original Innis & Gunn is stored for a longer period, but in a previously unused oak cask.  While Innis & Gunn do not reveal the source of their Highland cask — the distillery or whisky used — those who are familiar with Scotch may be aware that the Highland area of Scotland is typically known for producing rich, subtlysweet, unpeated/mildy peated whisky.

Herein we are reviewing the 2010 edition, which was aged in a 21 year old Highland cask; the bottle has therefore been sitting idle for about a year, and, since the alcohol by volume (ABV) is not nearly high enough to preserve it indefinitely, some minor changes may have occurred. Nonetheless, we each strive to appreciate and score the products we review by focusing squarely on 4 characteristics — nose, body, flavour, finish; we do not allow preconceptions or politics to interfere with our judgement.

– Kamran

*****

Innis & Gunn is perhaps my favourite beer producer — it’s a toss up between them and Phillips — and, as a whisky enthusiast, the annual Highland Cask is, to me, amongst the pinnacle of beer creation. While I’m not nearly as big of a fan of the 2010 edition as I am of the newest (2011, 18 year cask) one — perhaps it’s the softening effect that an extra 3 years of oak maturation admits, or the fact that we drank a bottle that was a  year old — I was still pleasantly satisfied with this particular Innis & Gunn beer.

Boasting many typical Innis & Gunn characteristics, the 2010 Highland Cask emits a bouquet of vanilla, caramel, and toffee, is rich, full bodied, and complex — best when *sipped* at somewhere between refrigerating and room temperature — and has a long lasting, savoury finish. Unlike the original or 2011 edition, this Innis & Gunn hosts notes of citrus on the nose and palate, somewhat reconcilable with Innis & Gunn’s Spiced Rum Finish (appears in the 2011 Winter 3-pack).

While the palate is somewhat more refined and complex than the 18 year Highland Cask from this year, it is also somewhat lighter, more fruity-citrusy, and less caramel-vanilla-toffee-like. This only proves how each cask provides a different flavour profile for the product stored within it; the particular cask, where it’s from, what it was previously used for, where it’s stored, and how long the aging lasts: all these things make  a difference, and this unique Innis & Gunn beer is one not to be missed — count yourself lucky if you can find one!

Nose: 22.5
Body: 23
Taste: 24

Finish: 24

Kamran: 93.5 pts.

*****

Since 2003 Innis and Gunn have made their mark in the beer world. This particular edition of their limited releases is a personal favourite of mine. Aged 49 days in the cask, as Kamran’s intro wonderfully describes, this honey coloured beer is light, smooth and has little head when poured, yet still full-bodied. This strong beer is fruity and sweet in its nose compiled of a toffee, caramel and vanilla aroma that causes anyone to greatly anticipate the moment of the first sip. The complexity of vanilla, oak and bitter notes are masterfully captured and blended in the flavor. The aftertaste on the palate is balanced between one of oak, and a spiced vanilla nature. Certainly a refreshing and smooth feeling/tasting experience.

Nose: 25
Body: 23.5
Taste: 25
Finish: 24

Tristan: 97.5 pts.

*****

If you have read my piece in the About section, you will know that there are few beers that can make a threshold of 90 or above, so anything that comes close should be considered noteworthy. This is the case with the Innis & Gunn 21yr Highland Cask, as its highly unique arouma combined with a one-of-a-kind flavour make it a special drinking experience. The influence of the Highland Cask is easily detected right from the start, as the scent of this beer bears a striking resemblance to that of a strong spirit. As you proceed to the tasting, you find a full bodied, yet smooth beer, which gives the illusion that you will be enjoying a very heavy drink, when in fact the beer is surprisingly light, giving it a higher consumption factor. This is emphasized by the beer’s distinctive caramel overtones, which are strong enough to notice, but are not overpowering, allowing you to enjoy the taste over a prolonged period. The finish continues this sensation, with a light bitterness to tell you that you should take another sip!

Nose: 22
Body: 22
Taste: 22
Finish: 22

James: 88 pts

*****

Final Average: 93 pts.

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Breaking The Seal

Since becoming of legal drinking age, the three of us — naively participating in the consumption of generic products — have been exposed to a variety of what we’d like to call ‘bad beers’. Tired of the big beer companies telling us what to drink, we have moved to a higher experience of beer — transcended the gap from cold, near frozen gnat’s urine to a more refined taste of robust hops and malts. What started simply as a method to keep track of the various beers, whiskys, wines, and other spirits, soon became a way to explore and enjoy these beverages together and then share them with others. We will continue to expand our own horizons, and hope to help you expand your own!

For us, the most efficient means of beginning this endeavour was to conduct a full scale tasting — which we did over a two night period. In the end, we were left having tasted, reviewed, and individually — as well as collectively — scored a total of 23 beers and 6 spirits. We will be publishing a single post for each drink tasted; using paragraphs, we will distinguish between each of our three individual opinions, reviews, and scores. The ‘scorecard’ will compile and average our grades, which are based on a 100 point scale (25 for nose, 25 for body, 25 for flavour, and 25 for finish).

In order to maintain a similar repertoire of beer and spirit background — cultivating our palates on similar paths — we will be meeting periodically for tastings; however, we will occasionally be forced to post individually. This is due to a variety of complications that come with the advent of creating a multiply authored blog, including our locations, scheduling conflicts, personal interests, and unique opportunities.

Cheers!

– James, Kamran, Tristan

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