Innis & Gunn Rum Cask

Oh the Innis & Gunn Rum Cask, a darker amber/brown nectar aged for 57 days in the cask. While it draws on the same techniques for brewing and flavours of the original, this beer is less sweet as the original yet still packs in a vanilla and toffee treat with the malt, and keeps a similar consistency in body. While I’m not sure where the idea came from to use rum instead of whisky, the results are very enjoyable.

-Tristan

*****

While the rum cask, now rum finish, is a regular Innis & Gunn product, that is available all year long, I don’t drink it nearly as much as the original. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a great beer, just not what I’m looking for when it comes to Innis & Gunn.

Aged in previously used rum casks, the beer is infused with Caribbean spices. Though a great fan of rum — likely my second favourite spirit — I’m not a huge fan of spicy beers, or wines for that matter. I like when a beer is spiced lightly with caramel, nutmeg, hops, etc. but if the spiciness is highly noticeable I take offense. That said, Innis & Gunn’s rum cask is not offensive, but it is certainly spiced to a level of slight distaste. I feel like it takes away from the effervescent oak-instilled flavours that I tend to love of Innis & Gunn.

Nose: 20.5
Body: 21
Taste: 19.5
Finish: 20

Kamran: 81 pts.

*****

The rum cask, while not my favourite of the series is quite a memorable beer. Like most all Innis & Gunns, it is typically very sweet as opposed to bitter. Aged 57 days and at 7.4% it also is stronger than your average beer.

On the nose I detected primarily a spiced scent, combined with a vanilla and mild toffee sweetness, as well as some evidence of a very faint rum and oak. The body is very smooth and velvety, while the taste is very little of the spiced nose elements but more a malty sweetness with the rum. The finish is a slow fade of sweetness that to me resembled a rum and coke fade.

While not the top in the collection, this beer certainly was a welcome addition to my fridge and while the Rum Cask has now been changed to a Rum Finish, I would highly recommend it to people who like beers on the malty side of the spectrum.

Nose: 23
Body: 22
Taste: 22
Finish: 19

Tristan: 85 pts.

*****

Final Average: 83 pts.

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Innis & Gunn Original

You are all in for a little treat. Tristan and I have tasted and reviewed each and every Innis & Gunn product released in the last 1-2 years. Since we’ve already posted on the Highland Cask 21 year (2010), that will be omitted, but you are soon to find reviews on the Original, Rum Cask, Canada Day 2011, Highland Cask 18 Year (2011), Rum Finish, Spiced Rum, Winter Ale, Irish Stout and, finally, the Canada Day 2012 — tasted vertically with a 1 year aged 2011. With the exception of the last two, we tasted the beers one after the other, within a night, referring and relating them to one another. This is how we will review them: with reference to one another. So, if you’re like us, and think Innis & Gunn makes some of the best beer in the world, take a trip through their collection with us!

Brewed in Scotland, Innis & Gunn follow a unique avenue in beer craftsmanship: oak-aging! You heard correctly; this is beer that, like most whiskies, rums, and red wines, has sat in an oak barrel, slowly picking up the flavours — vanilla, toffee, caramel, oak, etc. — the wood has to offer. There are few breweries that perform this feat, and Innis & Gunn, the originators, are — put simply — the best.

Oak cask maturation not only gives the beer it’s colour, it transforms the flavour compounds in ways unlike anything else. The original Innis & Gunn is stored for 79 days, longer than any of the other Innis & Gunn beers, but they utilize a virginal oak cask. In fact, Innis & Gunn original was first utilized by whisky distillers to imbue whisky casks with some beer flavour. Thank God one of them realized the beer they were throwing out was delicious! You may find the original regularly in both government and private liquor stores. It comes in single 330 or single 750 ml bottles, at a relatively inexpensive price, making it a real ‘go-to’ beer.

– Kamran

*****

The Innis & Gunn Original, while not my favourite beer in the world — though pretty damn close — is probably the beer I drink the most. Though I love to expand my horizons and try different beers, I find myself constantly returning to the Innis & Gunn; If I am picking out beer for a night, I almost always grab at least one. It’s a near perfect beer that everyone must try at least once in their life!

Smooth, Creamy, Rich, Vanilla, Toffee, Butterscotch: These are the main terms to describe Innis and Gunn beer, particularly the original. It is a true sipping beer that gets better with age and aeration. So, pour it into a glass, let it sit, then slowly enjoy it over time. On the nose, the original is replete with notes of vanilla, toffee, caramel, and oak. On the palate, these flavour are not subdued. They are rather MORE pronounced. It’s truly amazing what this low carbonated beer is capable of. The finish is long and smooth, making you, at once, desire another bottle.

Nose: 24
Body: 23.5
Taste: 24.5
Finish: 23.5

Kamran: 95.5 pts.

*****

Well this is the start of something fun! Yes, indeedy folks, we have done some palate practice and tackled the recent collection of fine beer from Innis & Gunn. While some may not have heard of them before, or seen the bottles in stores but passed over it… you need to try this beer a couple of times to really appreciate it. Luckily it’s not too expensive, and if you’re looking to expand you beer palate this is a good way to start. I moved away from the typical beers when I got my first batch of Innis & Gunn due to sheer curiosity. Now it is still one of my favourite breweries.

The original is the first I tried, naturally… …while I wasn’t so used to the taste at age 19, it did grow on me the few times I revisited it a few months later! Aged for 77 days and at 6.6% alcohol/volume, it is not a light beer, but a happy medium.  On the nose it has a rich and light sweetness to it, as well as a toffee, vanilla, and oaken aroma. Very appealing in my books. The body was, again, rich and light with a sweetness from the malt, toffee and vanilla. It was also quite smooth leading to a high level of drinkability. The flavour was malty, with light vanilla and toffee under the oak tones. In terms of an aftertaste or finish, the malt lingers on the palate with the taste slowly fading away. Very unobtrusive finish, which leads to the ability to enjoy several in a night should you choose.

While not my favourite of the collection, it is a very consistent beer in delivery across the spectrum for which we score. The recent arrival of Innis & Gunn on tap in Vancouver has however reaffirmed my appreciation of this beer as the difference in taste due to freshness is noticeable. As previously stated, try this beer!

Nose: 22.5
Body: 22.5
Taste: 22.5
Finish: 22.5

Tristan: 90 pts.

*****

Final Average: 92.75 pts.

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What We’re Up To…

Over the next few days Kamran and I will release the reviews we’ve written of a particular brewery we’ve been tasting for a while now. With the newest seasonal release, these beers shall be posted in chronological release order, as well as comparisons to vertical tastings  we performed on certain styles! I know we’re excited to post them and share these ones with the wider world.

-Tristan

Here’s a teaser photo of what I’m talking about…

A Hard Days Night

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Samuel Smith Oatmeal Stout

Established in 1758, Yorkshire’s oldest brewery, Samuel Smith, is one of few major UK breweries that are being steadily imported by the BCLDB. At any time of the year, one my find a variety of beers produced by Samuel Smith, such as their Nut Brown, IPA, or, what we’re reviewing today, their Oatmeal Stout. Sold in single 500ml bottles, the beer, though relatively expensive, doesn’t break the bank — you don’t have to buy a whole 6-pack! — so it’s certainly worth the risk!

– Kamran

*****

To me, there is no risk involved. This is a great oatmeal stout that will please the palate of any and all guzzler’s of dark beer. Though originally used as a marketing tool, the addition of oatmeal, here, is not done in vain, as it’s done in some other so-called oatmeal stouts. The small proportion of oats lend a protein-based smoothness and a slight enhancement of the vanilla sweetness already contained in the stout. While I’m a huge fan of Guinness, I’d highly recommend trying Sam Smith as an alternative for stout incorporated cooking.

The nose has plenty of malt, but not enough to overwhelm. This is similar on the palate, where the sweetness of the oatmeal, as well as the variety of malts, come through. It is quite delicate, and finely balanced; however, I’d prefer more roast and hops than what is given — Mcauslan (St. Amroise) Oatmeal Stout fits this bill. The body is rich, creamy, and smooth, but also fairly heavy. This, of course, is expected of a stout. On the finish, there is a lingering sweetness that is quite savoury. Overall, this is a great beer, a must try, and one I will continually return to.

Nose: 21
Body: 21
Taste: 21.5
Finish: 21.5

Kamran: 85 pts.

*****

Oatmeal stout is something I usually find thicker, and sweeter than a typical stout. However there were some noticeable differences, such as the beer was less creamy thick as I’m usually accustomed to and the flavor wasn’t as sweet. It was almost as if it were a more delicate silky texture to it, which was a nice feeling in the mouth.

The nose was understandably sweet from the malt, but I picked up on notes I typically detect in scotch to be faintly noticeable. The body was solid black in colour, less creamy than a Guinness opting for that more silky texture. The taste was rich and savory once the initial malt had flashed the palate. The richness of it would lead to me to assume that after one bottle of this beer, would have the same filling reaction as a couple of creamy stouts. The finish was an unobtrusive sweetness that was savory and dry.

I, like Kamran, did really enjoy this beer. It was a nice complexity for a stout that was neither too heavy or watered down. Due to it being an imported product it may seem expensive, but well worth it if you wish to treat yourself to a solid evening beer. Next Samuel Smith beer to try will be the Taddy Porter which is currently in my beer fridge.

Nose: 20
Body: 23.5
Taste: 19
Finish: 21

Tristan: 83.5 pts.

*****

Final average: 84.25 pts.

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Brooklyn Black Chocolate Stout

Here we have a relatively special beer from Brooklyn Brewing, a craft brewery located in, you guessed it, Brooklyn. While the flavour of chocolate is quite often imparted organically in the making of a stout, some brewmasters, especially in recent times, will add chocolate into the mix, post fermentation. In this case, we have black chocolate added to give Brooklyn’s stout an extra little kick.

– Kamran

*****

I love dark chocolate, and I love dark beers: I will love this. This seems logical, right? Well, though logical, it was only partially right. I didn’t love this beer, but I did rightly enjoy it.

Beneath the malty sweetness lies a noticeable, but relatively subdued, chocolate aroma. With air and a bit of warmth, the chocolate comes out more. At 10%, the beer is heavy, and, actually, a bit harsh. The alcohol unfortunately takes away from the flavour & smoothness lent by the chocolate. However, if you hold the liquid in your mouth, like how you might do with a whisky, some of the alcohol evaporates and the beer gets some air through it, making it creamier — velvety — and more flavourful.

On the palate, the beer goes from having a malt sweetness, to being slightly tart, and finishes with a light hop bitterness. In all three respects, the sensations are quite mild. The finish doesn’t leave much, aside from the remaining malt tones; however, upon exhalation, the chocolate comes out more. So, drink this beer while breathing out your mouth!

Nose: 19
Body: 19.5
Taste: 20.5
Finish: 20

Kamran: 79 pts.

*****

I am very much a fan of solid porters and stouts as I may have mentioned in previous posts, and I for one did really enjoy the richness of this particular Brooklyn brew. At 10% alc/vol. this beer has a wee bit o’ strength to it, hidden within one of heavier and certainly blackest stouts on the market. If one considers Guinness a meal in a glass and struggles to finish one, I’d likely suggest stealing a few sips from a friend who orders this as opposed to a whole pint or bottle.

The aroma of the beer is one of malt and chocolate… as if anything else were to be expected?! The body is heavy and thick, with a velvety texture when held in the mouth. Certainly some level of complexity to balance the malt and chocolate, but the alcohol is evident and adds a little roughness to the mix – so not exactly a smooth sipper. Surprisingly, this stout wasn’t as chocolate flavored as I expected compared to stouts I’ve tried at craft pubs like the Alibi Room or St. Augustine’s in Vancouver. Perhaps it was the noticeable presence of the higher alcohol percentage, or the type of chocolate used, but I expected a more dominant taste in that regard. The finish was bitter followed what i can only describe as a brief tartness followed by a longer lasting mix of chocolate and slight hops.

While the lack of chocolate taste and the “tartness” I sensed at the end were two detractors from the beer, it wasn’t bad at all. I did enjoy the richness of it but unlike Guinness, I could not drink more than one or two of these in a night. However, while not a stout, a local chocolate porter that’s just as good would be the Phillips Chocolate Porter which is much lighter and more chocolate tasting.

Nose: 21.5
Body: 24
Taste: 19
Finish: 19

Tristan: 83.5 pts.

*****

Final Average: 81.25 pts.

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Howe Sound Woolly Bugger Barley Wine

At, 11%, 75 IBUs, brewed with pale, crystal, cara, chocolate and special B malts, and seasoned with nugget, fuggles, and golding hops, the Howe Sound Woolly Bugger barley wine is a highly complex, highly refined, must-see-for-yourself beer. It is thick, with bits of sediment/pebbles floating in the bottle; not to worry, decant it finely and enjoy the character it bestows.

– Kamran

*****

While not a huge fan of barley wine, and having not yet tasted one that really floats my boat, the Howe Sound Woolly Bugger blew me away. The beer is bursting with flavour, both on the nose and the palate; each individual sensation is distinct, yet well integrated, and highly pronounced. On the nose, there is a rich chocolate caramel sweetness that mingles with delicate hops — particularly the fuggles (reminds me of the Anchor Christmas Ale) — and a red wine-like acidity. The alcohol presents itself with a slightly citrus sourness that deftly complements the rich sweetness of the malts.

The beer is profoundly sweet, but the malty sweetness is balanced by robust hops, and enough IBUs to instill a crisp finish. At 11%, it is slightly heavy and the malt sticks to the sides of your cheeks. Since the flavours are so well endowed, you really can’t drink too much; one is perfect. This is currently the best barley wine I have tried, though I never got a chance to taste Driftwood’s highly regarded ‘Old Cellar Dweller’. Rogue, however, makes a close second.

Nose: 22
Body: 20
Taste: 23.5
Finish: 21.5

Kamran: 87 pts.

*****

Without a doubt, Howe Sound Brewing’s Woolly Bugger is one of the best barley wines I’ve had to date. With an 11% alcohol content and 75 IBU’s, this beer packs a pleasant and complex punch with the wide variety of malts and hops contained in the bottle. And while generally I’m not a huge fan of beers with fuggles hops (such as the Innis and Gunn Canada Day 2011 release), the mix of fuggles with other varieties was a nice counter balance to the malts. This beer had an ability to constantly keep your palate guessing as to the flavours and an ability to leave you wanting more; a feeling some barley wines lack.

On the nose, the malty sweetness is quite prevalent as in any barley wine, yet the fuggles hops really cut through to my sense of smell. Surprisingly hoppy, the floral aroma is very inviting when mixed with the malty sweetness. The body is thicker than I anticipated, but it still allows for easy drinking. In terms of taste – having been sitting in my cellar aging for over  six months – the tones of chocolate were noticeable through the sweetness. As well, the hops was adding to the rich complexity that Kamran and I both enjoyed. The finish had a flash of bitterness on the tongue with a lingering sweetness and a chocolate taste that seemed to stick to the cheeks and back of the tongue. It even had the similarity of an alcohol taste like a cognac from what we could derive.

This beer is best enjoyed alone and at a cool temperature, and is one of the only barley wines I could recommend as a session beer if the occasion arose seeing as I could easily have a few in a night. So if you happen across this beer in a store, buy it and enjoy!

Nose: 22.5
Body: 23
Taste: 22.5
Finish: 21.5

Tristan: 89.5 pts.

*****

Final Average: 88.25 pts.

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Phillips Mass Extinction Ice Barley Wine

 

This is a unique beer, if there ever was one. Phillips Mass Extinction ice barley wine “underwent a crystalline phase which distilled the remaining liquid into a naturally sweetened nectar of caramel”. In other words, this beer was literally frozen, like the late-harvested grapes used for icewine, in order to concentrate the sugars, and release a high percentage (12%), yet still highly sweet beverage.

– Kamran

*****

While Phillips Mass Extinction is flavourful, powerful, and unique, it is quite one-dimensional; it is plainly sweet and malty. Similar to their Trainwreck, the flavours are quite subdued, or contained. The beer certainly needs some air to run through it to open it up. Since it is kept in a frozen state for a relatively long period of time, I suppose they use lager or pilsner yeast. The result is a slightly metallic and alcohol filled nose — all that can really be sensed under the malty sweetness.

While it is quite complex, the potential for pleasant flavours is all but restricted. The malt and alcohol overpowers the character of the sweetness; I could not even taste the caramel that Phillips claims on the bottle is prominent. That said, despite the lack of flavour, the sweetness itself, if tasted in just the right way, gives a beautiful sensation on the tip of one’s tongue. For this reason alone, I can enjoy the beer.

While the body is kind of heavy, it’s not quite as bogging-down as some other barley wines, such as the trainwreck. However, the alcohol at 12% is certainly noticeable. The sweetness kills the alcohol on the finish, making it not so harsh to go down. There is a slight sickly sweetness that sticks to your gums; at first it is quite pleasant, but the lingering of it is not appreciated. While Phillips is my favourite Vancouver Craft brewery, I have simply been underwhelmed by their barley wine.

Nose: 18.5
Body: 19.5
Taste: 20.5
Finish: 19.5

Kamran: 78 pts.

*****

I’ve had this beer on a couple of occasions now, and I have to admit… when compared to other barley wines this does not appeal to me at all. I’d much prefer the other Phillips barley wine, Trainwreck, over this for a few reasons. First it’s sickly sweet for my taste-buds. Secondly, I am unable to determine its complexity or if it really does taste plain. Lastly, again it is just too damn sweet. Now I understand that this beer would appeal to some sections of the population, but most of those who do like it must have lived on candy through their childhood and pound back sugar with their coffee and cream – any chance I can work in a lyric from the Beastie Boys is a good day! I appreciate the effort that went into making this beer. It has a very cool process of creation which takes some serious dedication, but the quality just wasn’t here for this particular brew.

As for the review, the nose is super sweet like a caramel with a metallic note to it. I sometimes get the same smell from lagers and pilsners so perhaps it’s the variety of yeast used. The body is a medium heaviness, with nice colouring and beading of carbonation. The taste is a caramel rich sweet, with perhaps notes of roasted chocolate malt hidden away. The finish is lingering malt that haunts your palate for an unwanted amount of time. It took some water and a few tic tacs to get a more pleasant taste back into my mouth.

While I do really like Phillips and their products, this did shake my faith in them. If someone were to ask me if I could recommend it, I probably would say don’t waste your time. I know I’m going to stick with the regular Phillips beers from now on.

Nose: 15
Body: 15
Taste: 13
Finish: 15

Tristan: 58 pts.

*****

Final Average: 68 pts.

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Phillips Trainwreck Barley Wine

A seasonal by Phillips brewery, this 10% barley wine packs a punch. For those unfamiliar, a barley wine has nothing to do with wine, except that it has a strong alcohol percentage — likening the percentage of wine. It is still, of course, fermented from grain — barley — rather than grapes, and, though many other styles of beer, such as a Russian Imperial Stout, may boast a high alcohol percentage, barley wines are a distinctly unique class of ale. They tend to be complex, earthy, fruity, a touch sour — winelike — and malty.

– Kamran

*****
I must admit, despite my current familiarity and experience with complex beers, such as barley wines and lambics, the Trainwreck, tasted about a half of a year ago, broke my barley wine cherry. Because of this, my initial impression of the beer was certainly flawed. I have since seen the err of my ways. The complexity of a barley wine surprised me, and I gave the beer extra credit simply for its uniqueness. Fact is, it’s really not unique, and after trying several other barley wines, the initially strong impression once held in my mind — of the Trainwreck — faded away.

The nose has a slight florality that is masked by delicate hops, lots of complex malts, and a slightly sour, wine-like — reminds me of a 1989 Chateaux Musar I once tasted — aroma. It’s quite heavy, and, therefore, a sipping beer; however, you couldn’t tell it was 10%. I certainly couldn’t drink more than one bomber bottle, though. Like with other complex beers, familiarity causes the flavours to grow on you, and I found myself enjoying it more as I continued drinking it. I think it was better warm, too. That said, the flavours are quite subtle, and nothing jumps out at you. In all its complexity, the flavours are muddled together, sending rather incoherent sensations on the palate. This results in what I find the weakest aspect of the beer: the finish. It lingers in an awkward, bitter-sour way. Still, a relatively enjoyable beer overall.

Nose: 20.5
Body: 20
Taste: 18.5
Finish: 17.5

Kamran: 76.5 pts.

*****

Now when it comes to barley wine I’m the first to admit, probably not a beer choice you’ll want to session all night long unless you find one that blows you away, and while the Phillips Trainwreck isn’t exactly one I’d recommend for a night session it does grow on you to the point where one or two of the 750ml bottles are a nice way to spend an evening with company. Certainly a beer that improves as you drink it, whether it be to the increase in flavours as it warms slowly or that your palate adjusts, this brew is likely my favourite of the two Phillips barley wines we’ve tried.

On the nose it has all the tell-tale signs of  barley wine in regards to sweetness with faint hops, and the body is fairly typical as well. The beer is savoury, smooth, and heavier compared to most barley wines, but certainly no liquid meal like some people find with stouts.  The flavour is caramel tones, with a slight hops tucked away. The finish is smooth with a slight bitterness/tang after you swallow it, with a lingering sweetness that you’d expect.

While I’ve certainly had better barley wines I could see myself ordering this at a pub or getting another bottle at the store for a night’s one-off beer. Not a wow-factor contender overall though, but the scoring is reflective on something above average at least.

Nose: 20.5
Body: 22
Taste: 19
Finish: 18.5

Tristan: 80 pts.

*****

Final Average: 78.25 pts.

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Anchor Liberty Ale

In San Francisco, Anchor Brewing has been a leader of the west-coast craft beer industry since the 1800s, beginning with their inaugural Anchor Steam Lager — one of my personal favourite lagers. The Liberty Ale, brewed for mere decades has become their second most reputable beer: a medium-well hopped, yet refreshingly light ale.

– Kamran

*****

First off, I love the designs on all the Anchor beers. The image on the 2011 Christmas Ale? Incredible! What a detailed and well drawn tree. I hate to say it, but an attractive bottle can always get a sale out of me. Fortunately for Anchor, their beer is good enough to justify the spectacular bottle designs, high-costs, and quality reputation.

While the Anchor Steam Lager — a crisp, well-hopped lager, may be my favourite lager — period, I think I prefer the Liberty Ale — I’m just not much of a lager boy. The Liberty Ale is slightly darker, dry-hopped, and opens with a delicate plethora of floral hops. The aroma is profoundly hoppy, despite the lack of IBUs; this is due to the combination of steam brewing and dry-hopping. On the palate, the hops — citrusy and floral, think (non-sour) grapefruit and juniper — give plenty of flavour, while not bogging it down with overuse.

The body is light and refreshing; it is quite well balanced. This lends itself to a crisp, slightly bitter finish. Regarding our previously reviewed beers, the Liberty Ale stands up to Phillips Blue Buck and Rogue’s Dead Guy Ale as one of the better session ales around.

Nose: 22.5
Body: 21.5
Taste: 22.5
Finish: 22

Kamran: 88.5 pts.

*****

While I’ve made it known I am not inclined to consume particularly hoppy beers, the Liberty Ale is certainly something I’d recommend to people who appreciate hops and the balance of floral and bitterness that accompanies it. Less subtle in hops than the Coney Island Lager by Schmaltz Brewing or Russell Brewing’s Blood Alley, this ale is much closer on the scale to an IPA than most typical ales I’ve drank. It is however a solid beer in it’s own regard and one that I’d happily split a six-pack of with a friend for a BBQ party.

For me the nose is the best part of hoppy beers. The floral aroma is always so inviting, and Anchor certainly know how to maximize on that! While it is certainly crisp and refreshing, I wouldn’t say it is a light beer, as there is a certain thickness to it. By no means is it near a stout or porter level of thickness, but it is far from being light as a lager or pilsner. With a mild hop taste and non-sweet fruity tones, this beer plays on the palate quite nicely. As a side-note, I thought I detected some trace amount of spice to the taste. The finish certainly has that floral hops taste to it that lingers the longest, with cameo appearances of fruit and some bitterness.

This was a good beer; not the best I’ve had, but one I’d try again. However, I’d probably try other beers produced by Anchor before returning to the Liberty Ale just so I can better reference it to the other available brews. I agree with Kamran’s assesment that Anchor, based on this beer alone in my experience, would fair nicely when compared to the likes of Phillip’s Blue Buck or Rogue’s Dead Guy Ale.

Nose: 21.5
Body: 18.5
Taste: 17.5
Finish: 17.5

Tristan: 75 pts.

*****

Final Average: 81.75 pts.

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Kross Golden Ale

Kross Brewing Company hails from Chile, and doesn’t even have an official website I can link you to. I guess the article will have to do. This golden ale came at a great price: 4 bottles for $8, and it’s well worth that cost. The end of a batch at Edgemont Fine Wines, Spirits, and Ales, I have yet to see the golden ale, or any other Kross beer for that matter, in any liquor store or bar since. I guess it was a bit of a one-off, but its unique taste and complexity makes it worthwhile, indeed.

– Kamran

*****

This is a fairly spicy beer. The nose shares notes of pepper, cumin, and a touch of nutmeg. There is a bit of malt, and a bit more hops that dance delicately on the palate, while bits and pieces of various spices may be perceived. The body is rich, smooth, and easy drinking, but has some “oomph”. It’s not a chugging beer, but not quite a sipper either — it’s highly well balanced in this regard. There is a subtle hop characteristic on the palate which relieves itself in a highly crisp finish. A true Chilean session beer!

Nose: 19
Body: 21.5
Taste: 20.5
Finish: 20.5

Kamran: 81.5 pts.

*****

Unlike Kamran I did not pick up the spiced notes of this beer to the extent I could name them, but still there was some zip in this Chilean sensation. Kross Golden Ale proved to be one of those beers that has potential to grow on a person, and I’m sure my marks would reflect that if I’d have had it over an expended period of time such as the summer months, but on a single tasting the score may seem to be a bit low in relation to what it could have gotten with more familiarity.

It was light and fruity/citric on the nose and the opaqueness of it seemed to remind me of a blond or wheat beer. While there was a sharpness in nose and body, the fruit and citrus presented themselves in the taste quite prominently on my palate. That may be where I lost the sense of spice Kamran referred too, since I focused on the fruity flavours of the brew. The aftertaste was a lingering sweetness that balanced out and faded away.

As I previously mentioned, it was a single tasting, but I feel this beer could have grown on me had it had more of a chance to sink in. While not an immediate favourite, I believe my scoring is honest to this brief encounter and I am open to reviewing it again should the opportunity present itself.

Nose: 18
Body: 18
Taste: 18
Finish: 18

Tristan: 72 pts.

*****

Final Average: 76.75 pts.

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